npr:

nprfreshair:

Lena Dunham, the creator and star of the HBO series Girls, has a new collection of personal essays called Not That Kind of Girl. She joined Fresh Air to talk about oversharing, feminism, OCD, and why she thinks most depictions of sex in movies are destructive.  

Lena Dunham On Sex, Oversharing And Writing About Lost ‘Girls’

(via katespencer)


lacigreen:

i think we all need a little fall magic rn

lacigreen:

i think we all need a little fall magic rn


milesbehn:

thegendercritic:

Gender is a hierarchy.  Gender is oppression. 

I want these in my house. To laugh and laugh and laugh at every day.



Q
Hey John! I live right outside of Dallas and a few school districts in the area have been pressured to suspend books from the 10th grade curriculum (fortunately not my district). We were assigned an article to read about these suspensions for a class, and I was disappointed to see An Abundance of Katherines on the list of controversial books. I know you got some flip a few years ago for Looking for Alaska, but Katherines is a lot milder, making it all the more annoying... Any thoughts? Thanks.
A

fishingboatproceeds:

This case seems especially enlightening to me because there are so few “dirty” or “controversial” parts in An Abundance of Katherines. I mean, it’s a buddy novel about two best friends who literally use the word “fug” in lieu of the word “fuck,” and who when they curse, do so mostly in Arabic or German. Is the non-English cursing the issue? It it the book’s abundance of abstract mathematics? Its misplacement of the tomb of Archduke Franz Ferdinand? The fact that one of the central characters is a Muslim?

I really don’t know. And it’s not clear to me that the school districts that have banned the book have a particularly good handle on the “why” of it either. 

I’m sorry if I sound a little exasperated here, but I’m frustrated because we train and pay teachers to teach, and then we don’t trust them to teach. 

Some parents seem to feel that public school exists solely for the benefit of their children and that everything in the curriculum must align with their value systems. But that’s ludicrous: Public schools exist for the benefit of the PUBLIC, so that we as a country might have a better educated population capable of critical thinking. We decided centuries ago that this was good—that education in childhood leads to more informed and engaged citizens, and that education also helps people to grow the economy through innovation and increased productivity. 

So my frustration isn’t with Katherines or any other book. It’s about what schools should do: Should schools tell you only what your parents think they should tell you? Or should that stuff be decided by the educators who’ve been trained explicitly for that purpose?


I urge you to please notice when you are happy.
Kurt Vonnegut (via laviesepoursuit)

(via milesbehn)




sweat-and-smiles:

long-distance-runnerr:

nezua:

motivation-station123:

bodydiy:

How to tie shoes for running

Wait I need this for my dystonia!!!!

seems like valuable info to pass along

I would have threw out 115$ shoes if I didn’t use the Toe problem one. God bless this post.

I use the heel slipping one and it actually works.

sweat-and-smiles:

long-distance-runnerr:

nezua:

motivation-station123:

bodydiy:

How to tie shoes for running

Wait I need this for my dystonia!!!!

seems like valuable info to pass along

I would have threw out 115$ shoes if I didn’t use the Toe problem one. God bless this post.

I use the heel slipping one and it actually works.

(via milesbehn)


I go down to the shore in the morning
and depending on the hour the waves
are rolling in or moving out,
and I say, oh, I am miserable,
what shall—
what should I do? And the sea says
in its lovely voice:
Excuse me, I have work to do.
Mary Oliver, from the book A Thousand Mornings (via fishingboatproceeds)

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.


pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henry de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.

And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. 

Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 

(via milesbehn)